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Peter Jones, the Ojibwe, and Evangelical Hymnody

Peter Jones (1802-1856) was one of the great Canadian Methodist leaders of the first half of the nineteenth century. As a missionary to the core, Jones rubbed shoulders with royals and bishops, spoke to crowds of thousands on both sides of the Atlantic, worked as a Bible translator, and was instrumental in the merging of Wesleyan Methodist denominations. All this was done with the ultimate goal of effectively reaching the Ojibwe people of Ontario with the gospel. While it should be already clear from this introduction why Jones is a name deserving of remembrance and study, there is one more...

Stones of Remembrance: Ontario’s First African Methodist Chapels 

In Two Worlds: The Protestant Culture of Nineteenth Century Ontario, William Westfall recounts the captivating story of how Ontario was once a bastion of a distinctive and dominant Protestant culture that shaped both the life and landscape of the province. If you are unfamiliar with this history, I highly recommend getting acquainted with it. Christians in Ontario have a remarkable heritage to tap into and learn from, especially as we seek to minister to an increasingly disinterested or even antagonistic world today. Lesser known still, taking place simultaneously with the events chronicled in Westfall’s book and contemporaneous to the culture-shaping...

Who Is Athanasius of Alexandria?

Today, we tend to take the doctrine of the Trinity for granted at some level—that is, we assume that it’s self-evident that Jesus, the Word of God, is fully God in all the ways God the Father is, likewise the Holy Spirit, but there’s still only one God, in the greatest, most beautiful mystery of our faith. But when we start thinking about the details, a lot of us are fuzzy. What does consubstantial even mean? How can three persons have a single essence? Or be a single essence? Some even ask, what does all this abstruse theological reasoning have...

Joe Rogan and the Search for Transcendence

Living in Montreal, I am used to encountering deeply secular people. No heaven above, no hell below, no God at all. Can you even show me one solid piece of evidence for your God? Why would you believe in old debunked myths? These are the kinds of questions they ask. How does one share the hope of the gospel with such people? Depending on the particular stripe of unbelief, it may be to poke holes in the materialist fortress, to point out self-evident echoes of eternity in their own beliefs, to show the moral implications of atheism, or any number...

R. J. Rushdoony: A Patriarch for Modern Theonomy

I grew up with R. J. Rushdoony and Gary North on my family’s bookshelves. My homeschool curriculum had indirect ties to him. Aspects of my university and seminary education also bore the influence of Rushdoony’s thought. I read the works of Cornelius Van Til (who influenced Rushdoony) and Greg Bahnsen to understand apologetics.[1] Despite these connection points, I had no reason to dig into Rushdoony’s works themselves. After all, theonomy had died out in the 1980s and 90s, which was preceded (if not caused) by infighting among its key players. Rushdoony and Gary North (his son-in-law), for example, had a...

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